​What (Tie) Knot to Forget: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

With all of the different types of tie knots out there, it’s important to remember that the wrong tie knot can definitely put a serious damper on your good style. So to help you avoid any reputation-breaking trends, we’ll break down the good, the bad, and the ugly of tie knots.

The Good
Instead of risking your good reputation, keep it real with a few of these timeless tie knots. We recommend grabbing a cheap silk tie from a consignment store so you can practice tying these knots without putting a lot of wear and tear on your everyday ties.

The Half-Windsor. Great for most silk ties, the Half-Windsor is what you’ll find amongst today’s most style-savvy professionals. It’s a great everyday knot and perfect for big occasions like interviews and presentations.

How to tie it:

  • Begin with the wide end to your right and the small end to your left, resting about 1-3 inches above your belly button.

  • Move the wide end to the left, over the small end. Then move the wide end under the small end to the right.

  • Move the wide end through the main neck loop and towards the left.

  • Then move the wide end across the front and to the right.

  • Next, move the wide end through the neck loop from underneath and then back down through the knot. From there, tighten it up by pulling on the wide end, slide up the knot, and you’re done.
     

The Windsor. This classic, triangular knot is great for those traditional wide ties. When executed right, The Windsor is perfectly symmetrical and just downright sophisticated—perfect for any occasion.  

How to tie it:

  • As you would with The Half-Windsor, begin with the wide end to your right and the small end to your left, resting about 1-3 inches above your belly button.

  • Move the wide end over the small end to the left and then up into the main neck loop.

  • Swing the wide end underneath the small end to the right, then back through the main neck loop, and out to the right.

  • Move the wide end across the knot to the left, up through the main neck loop, and down through the knot.

  • Tighten the knot, adjust, and you’re in.

 
The Prince Albert. Looking to get regal and refined with your formal wear? Check out the Prince Albert. Use it for occasions when it’s okay to shake up your formal wear a bit, like weddings or casual Fridays.

How to tie it:

  • Start with the wide end to your right and the small end to your left, resting about three inches above your belly button.

  • Move the wide end underneath the small end to the right.

  • Move the wide end back around the front, then move it underneath the knot and back around the front a second time.

  • Move the wide end up through the main neck loop, then down and beneath both knot loops.

  • Tighten the knot and adjust as usual.

 
The Oriental Knot. If you just want to keep it simple and classic, we’ve got the perfect knot for you. It’s easy enough to do, and great if you want to keep the handling of your tie to a minimum.

How to tie it

  • As with the other knots, you’ll want the wide end on the right and the small end on your left, 1-3 inches above your belly button. However, the only difference here is that the backside of the tie should be facing up.

  • Move the wide end under the small end to the left, then back over the front and to the right.

  • Take the wide end underneath the small end and up through the main neck loop, then through the knot.

  • Tighten the knot, slide it up, and you’re good to go.

 
The Bad
The Trinity. Featuring a three-way knot, The Trinity is a great way to take the attention away from the subtleties and clever patterns of a unique tie.

The Kelvin. It’s like the standard simple knot, only more off-center.  The Kelvin seems like a nice alternative to the Oriental Knot we all know and love, but it’s somewhat on the sloppy side.

The Ugly
The Eldredge. If you want to give your ties a beating, go with The Eldredge. While it looks strange, The Eldredge is a great way to make yourself late for work, with all those loops and spins and whatnot.

The Van Wijk. This thing takes The Prince Albert for a few superfluous loops for what is a pretty silly looking knot. But hey, if you don’t take your style seriously, then by all means, go with The Van Wijk. Otherwise, forget it.

Of course, even the best tie knot is only as good as the tie itself, so be sure to make a statement with some intriguing new ties. Squiddledee Ties offers a huge variety of ties in clever, yet classy patterns that are specially designed to flow with your personality. With unique styles like “Turtle and Hare” and the “Bluebird of Happiness,” Squiddledee Ties are the sophisticated way to get noticed. They’re all made right here in the U.S. with 100 percent silk for stunning quality that always makes a great impression.

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